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this week on to the contrary: first, little girls and big guns. then, bias against women in science. behind the headlines: bpa, a chemical used in plastic that's everywhere and raising health concerns. >> hello, i'm bonnie erbe. welcome to to the contrary, a discussion of news and social trends from diverse perspectives. up first, tweeting firestorm. gop vice presidential candidate paul ryan generated controversy this week when he stopped off from his campaign to buy hunting gear for his 10-year-old daughter. the avid hunter said his daughter is ready to go hunting for the first time. he bought her a rifle for christmas last year. ryan fans banded together on twitter to show their second endment support by posting pictures of their daughters shooting all types of guns, ranging from pistols to semi-automatic weapons. the informal girls with guns campaign had hundreds of fans posting stories and pictures to twitter and other social networking sites. but not everyone is all smiles. some parents voiced concern about putting guns in the hands of children. >> so congresswoman, norton, w
of sciences opened in 2008, it quickly became one of the top tourist magnets in the city. part of the cal academies' astronomical success is the weekly nightlife party. >> i am joined by helen, who is here to school me on all the nocturnal activities that are getting ready to take place here. tell us a little about what we can expect to see at nightlife. >> we open up the doors every thursday night at the california academy of sciences. there are certain things you can see every week you can go to the museum, visit the planetarium, and we bring in bars and a deejay or band. it is a different feel from during the day, something different every week. tonight , we have beer and music. -- tonight we have great beer and music. it is beer week. we have a dozen local brewers in african hall. we have a deejays to set up throughout the museum and a live performance at 9:00 p.m. tonight. >> what has been your favorite part as a participant or as an observer? >> my favorite part is to walk around the aquarium in to see people with a drink in their hands, getting to know maybe somebody new, may be lo
the arts and sciences. there is luther burbank and jack london. there was a thing on the side. it says federal art project and has beginning and ending date. that is a wall which becomes a tomb stone. the artists themselves are becoming ghosts. that's what he's doing there. joseph danish. head of the projects, it is it was a wonderful time that he woke up every morning wondering how long it would last. they were being paid to produce public art. well, what happened of course is the war. the war came along. and roosevelt could see it coming. so, very few people understand the new deal segways into war. they beefed up the military bases like fort mason. my 1943, they are all killed. the war did what the new deal couldn't do, full employment. there were reports, it's still with mind numbing statistic. we have to rely on other people to do it. the these projects enriched the lives of millions of people and does so today all the time. i have become aware of it, but very few people are. i have also become aware extraordinary people. here's a dedication of roosevelt. on the left, who painted
is a professor of political science at the university of san diego. he has worked on campaigns going back to the 1970s, and he is also the author of "the candidate." welcome back inside "the war room," profez or. >> it's a pleasure to be back with you governor. >> jennifer: all right. do you think this has been taken to a new level this year? >> i think it has been taken to a new level every year, and gets more mindless meaningless and irrelevant every year. >> jennifer: i love that. because? because? is it going to matter? >> no, nobody cares what you thought going in. if you think your team is going to lose and they lose is that better than if you think they are going to win and they lose. [ laughter ] >> what counts is what happens in the debate not what you tell people. this is like a high school pep rally. >> jennifer: all right. i want to talk a little bit about prep, because you had some very interesting experiences. you played ronald reagan for jimmy carter ahead of the 1980 debates, and in your book you write this about what hand to president carter . . . what t
% registered democrats. but only 14% are republican. social science is only 6%. >> 70 2% self identify as liberal. which is a big disparity between them and the general public. john: you were a junior when obama was elected? >> it was light a little of the colt it happened across the nation. john: not just the attitude but there are actual space -- speech restriction red light, yellow light and this university was demoted? >> to policies unc maintains which is sexual-harassment if you attended college and other than unc it bans all sexually explicit jokes. john: david, you have a copy what did you find? >> sexually explicit jokes jokes, books, it is different -- difficult to control how you look at someone. policy in the residence halls to avoid using the returners spoken word in the way that offends. that is a rage asleep fraud. a picture of mitt romney would offend 70%. [laughter] john: you may not explicitly or implicitly asked for sex. john: then how do you get there? [laughter] is it automatically rate? >> these policies are not well thought out. this is what you get to with burea
the assistant principal asked concerning as science teachers largess. somebody suggested confiscating all the furniture from the site and swing. learning happens in many different ways. the something this silly could get out of hand the pressure everybody was under. science teachers especially. anabel garza looked at the ceiling. she knew mr. kaiser was yon had time and energy to use but -- bair and tables she had the maker once. tell her to lasso the but. i told them not to move furniture. ordinary drama made for a pleasant distraction after the meeting she made her rounds coming across the teacher worried about turning down the fish tank due to drought conditions. there is a living thing in their. [laughter] so the next passage something that should never have to happen. a few months later anabel has rounded up some of her best students to go to the middle school. it was like scores are coming up and they need to show the middle school students they have a reason to come to reagan high. this will also include at the start athlete at the school at the time now at i was stay on a football
. live claritin clear. my high school science teacher made me what i am today. our science teacher helped us build it. ♪ now i'm a geologist at chevron, and i get to help science teachers. it has four servo motors and a wireless microcontroller. over the last three years we've put nearly 100 million dollars into american education. that's thousands of kids learning to love science. ♪ isn't that cool? and that's pretty cool. ♪ am i don't know. anyool? medications? and that's pretty cool. last immunization shots? really? honey, what's my blood pressure medicine called? one time i took something and i blew up like a puffer fish. i'm probably allergic to that. at kaiser permanente, your medical information is available to you and your doctors. quickly. securely. no guesswork required. better information. better care. kaiserpermanente. thrive. >>> fade in -- los angeles county, california. garrett warren was gunned down, shot four times in his own home, but somehow survived. it fit his character really. a hollywood stuntman, martial artist and former fighter. not only did he survive, but
information that i am reporting on. i mean it's 400 pages of science, new discoveries of -- that should be changing the way we think about women and arousal and helping us understand that men's and women's sexual responses are not the same. just conventional wisdom that we are talk in from 40 years ago there is this amazing new neuroscience that shows there is a brain gentleman va gina vagina connection that people may be upset about not my leaders they are thrilled to learn more about themselves. the data explains why 30% of women report low sexual desire and another 30% some of the same well, some different, say that they don't reach orgasm when they want to. even in a hyper sexual icedized society. this is t*s not working for not working for women but this explains why. >> gavin: you are working around the mind vagina connection about, how is that controversial? it connects -- >> it's so funny, i wrote a book called misconceptions about the birthing industry which documented to understand of data on the brai
learning to bubble in a multiple choice response. it is not literature, science, innovation, or creativity. it is not innovation. we need rigor and imagination. you need both. you have the left hand and the right hand. we have to combine those things. in california, we create innovation by ab32, but the only state with the cap and trade program, we create it by cutting regulation. i had to fire two incumbent people in our division of conservation. there were blocking oil exploration. i fired them and the oil permits for drilling went up 18%. we have to work on many levels. we're promoting efficiency. we're promoting and renewable energy and climate change -- i take courage change very seriously. we have got to do with it and there is a lot of resistance. but we deal with that through enlightened government policies, feedback, and changing them when we find they do not work. and encouraging the private sector where the ideas come up. i do not think -- steve jobs working in his career came up with stuff. i did not know that steve jobs was working in that group on the computer. we want to hav
our police resources wisely or not using science to guide where to use our police resources. we need to look at our transportation system and revolutionize that. that will improve a lot of things, public health, public safety, commerce. so we need to be looking with a vision for the future about what we want our city to be. and i think i have done that before and like i said, i'm for prevention. and i'm for looking to the future and figuring out how we can sculpt a better san francisco and that is what i will do as supervisor. thank you, mr. davis. i want to remind folks and point out that we have seen a disturbing trend in san francisco over the past couple ever years. of years. we have had a lot of leadership appointed for us. an appointed mayor, appointed district attorney when our leaders are chosen for us instead of by us. if you want leadership in our city, i'll i'm your candidate. at juliandavis.org, there is more detail about the grassroots campaign we're building. i encourage you to look where the candidates are getting their money from. i think it says a lot about whose i
in the science laboratory lab, two girls are discussing their project. >> you don't even know what you are doing the -- doing. you're dumb. >> you test too much. >> the day has come. the projects are to be returned. >> see, i told you? mine was the best. i told you, dummy. besides, let me see what you guys have. >> you know, i'm leaving. after school, alice and delores park thinking about human behavior. >> i don't know what people want to -- from me, for real. i have to say i think people just want me to be perfect. but you know what? i am capable of doing anything. it doesn't matter who i am or the way i look. what matters is the effort. i will study more. >> alice studied hard. she gets automatic a's. she's on the honor roll! -- she gets all a's. she's on the honor roll. >> oh, my god. i can't believe it? you see? i am capeable. don't call me dummy. now who do you think schnur i am a girl with just good grades. >> the morale of this story is that no matter what people think about you, all you have to do is show who you really are. even if the situation isn't good for you, you must make the be
of the things we talked about is having their staffing, which talked-about having science. encouraging people to go across the street if they are smoking in large numbers. they have agreed to that. i do not know of that -- if that is conditionable. we are -- to promote that with customers. that we do not have a big smoke cloud. >> it is a big parking lot. so that is perfect. >> is not enforceable but the smoking code says you have to go to the end of the curb. there is no way we can force them to do otherwise. sometimes being a good neighbor and encouraging patrons, there will be compliant. other than that, we're happy with the move. >> any questions for officer mathias? let's hear from the public. are there people from the public who would like to address this permit? your welcome. >> here is a song for the new gold dust. i wrote the song. >> did anyone tell you if you look like stacey slaughter who works for the giants? >> she does. >> you have a twin out there. >> here we go. ♪ in san francisco's fight to save the historic bar ♪ ♪ it was the 23rd of may but we are packing up the piec
is science given at grades five, eight and ten. you see the same double digit trend with the district moving from 51.2 to 51.6. and as i said when we look we have three lenses in which we look at these scores. the first is over time. the second is movement. looking at the same group of students that took the test two years in a row and how did they move in their proficiency level? so we had matched scores for 30,000 students. and when they began the year last year they came in at 60.4 percent proficiency and by the end of the year 62.7 or 63% of them were profishtd. looking at all the proficiency levels and how students moved we found the movement to be around 16.6 percent or 70% to round it which means seven out of every ten students either remained profirkt or advanced or moved up one level. okay. i'm going to repeat that. seven out of every ten students either remained proficient and advanced or moved up a level. in math we found the movement to be at 73% and this was similar to what we saw in [inaudible]. as i said the third lens by which we look at these scores are acceleratio
their children educated. they want to get our edge back in science, and they want a policy headed by the president that helps close this gap that's widening between the united states and europe and japan. the american people want to keep opening doors. they want those civil rights laws enforced. they want the equal rights amendment ratified. they want equal pay for comparable effort for women. and they want it because they've understood from the beginning that when we open doors, we're all stronger, just as we were at the olympics. i think as you make the case, the american people will increasingly come to our cause. itmr. mondale, isn't possible that the american people have heard your message -- and they are listening -- but they are rejecting it? >> well, tonight we had the first debate over the deficit. the president says it'll disappear automatically. i've said it's going to take some work. i think the american people will draw their own conclusions. secondly, i've said that i will not support the cuts in social security and medicare and the rest that the president has propos
science professor matthew krenston said the poll reveals unlikely allies united in opposition and for different reasons. >> for republican, gambling represents way to get resources for the expansion of government without having to impose tax. way of short circuiting the political system. that's probably why they are opposed to that. for african-americans, reasons may be a little more complex. first, many belong to religious denominations that take a dim view of gambling. second, the largest concentration of african-americans in the state is this country where the new casino would go. >> pollsteres all probed who feels more intense about the issue? 54% of those claiming that expanded gaming is most likely to get them out to the polls plan to vote against it. so the pro and con tv ads may not be helping either side's cause. >> i think if they succeeded in making people angry on both sides. >> that was david collins reporting. >>> imagine 80% voter turnout in the united states. believe it or not, that was the actual statistic voting in the 2008 presidential election in one segmen
. >> and with all the science behind natural advantage, the results are truly amazing. it's real science that gives you natural beauty. in a clinical study, within eight weeks 100% of women saw a reduction in the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles, a decrease in the appearance of pore size, and a decrease in the appearance of skin blotchiness. and we're not talking minimal results here. uneven skin tone was improved by an incredible 70%, and the appearance of visible lines and wrinkles was decreased by 50%. that's like seeing half your wrinkles simply seem to disappear. you can be your own age, but be the best that you can be. your skin glows and radiates a more-youthful suppleness, and you shine from within with natural confidence. you're aging naturally... and beautifully. >> i'm 44. >> i'm 61. >> i'm 40 years old. >> i'm 61 years old. >> i'm 71 years old. >> these women all look years younger than their actual age. so what's their secret? they use natural advantage-- one of the most powerful cosmeceutical anti-aging systems ever developed. so why is natural advantage so effective in making wo
i think the worse case scenario is to be some cheesy science project dirty bomb or something with low you but you float into the seattle harbor or whatever on a container ship, or something like tel aviv harbor or whatever. so there's no like destroy the world scenario that's likely, in my opinion, with any of these terrorist regimes. and i think it's important for people who don't understand nuclear weapons to know that, to realize that. so the thing that occurred to me was you said, you were saying that if we had such a thing happen, like a hiroshima type weapon go off in one of the harbors or something like that, we wouldn't know at the time it's too late to know how to respond, where do you respond. so i guess my question would be, that's still the case now, how do we know where to respond? i guess other than iran and korea, how do we know even how to begin to respond now while we think these guys are developing their science project weapon? >> let me take the last part first. we have nuclear forensics for certain countries. we know the signatures of the weapons. russia,
's ideas. >> our guest next sunday taking your calls, the mills, and tweets. a science writer and columnist for discover magazine will look at the cyberworld, popular culture, and computer networking and politics liven in eastern. >> his thoughts on the interpretation of the u.s. constitution and what the author teams are many obtuse passages. the constitution cannot be understood by its original text alone, but through historical precedent. discusses his book with supreme court justice clarence thomas at the national archives here in washington. this is about power and 20 minutes. >> could evening. it's a pleasure to welcome you to the national archive. a special welcome to our friends at c-span and the other media outlets to are with us tonight. special guest in the audience today that i want to single out for special welcome, senator mike lee who is a good friend of the national archives. the future supreme court justice , he was at the u.s. court of appeals for the third circuit. welcome. on monday the constitution of the u.s. states turned 225. tonight's program is one of several that
registered voters will request a mail in ballot. san jose state political science profession or says campaigning know they have to reach voters sooner. >> they have to put those ads out earlier than they would have in the past. >> one of the most talked about initiatives in san jose, it would raise minimum age from 8 to $10 an hour. they say their grass roots campaign can't take any votes for granted. >> we started not just a few weeks before the early voting but we have been going at it for about 2 months now. >> reporter: backed by the silicone valley chamber of customers. these political ads are going up now. say early voting and mail in ballot make it more expensive. but waiting until the end of october is not an option. >> if you wait you have no chance of winning. >> reporter: several bat on the drop off-sites like this one will open up october 8. you can go to our website for locations. just click on web links. matt keller. >>> some same sex couples are getting a reprieve from the federal government. partners in which one is an illegal immigrant will put their deportation on h
is absolutely right, we need more of stem education, science, engineering, math, technology. there is a clear path to solving this problem. it basically must recognize we have to start producing as much or more than we consume. this whole thing about going to the walmart, yeah, it's cheap there but we have to understand the consequences. >> let me ask you about this. consumer confidence is up, a n cnnorc poll asks how the economy will be a year from now. two-thirds think it will be in better shape. that american optimism is critical but we can't fall into the traps by buying cheap stuff we don't need, it's all imported. >> nobody says it's not needed. imagine living without your iphone. >> a pair of tennis shoes. >> i agree with the point our new growth and prosperity will be made out of technology and we need education. we can't do that by bashing china. i tell you why. they are the largest foreign holder of our now $16 trillion national debt. they own over $1 trillion of u.s. treasuries. they lend to us. we buy stuff, they get dollars and then they invest back into our treasury bills, clo
what i learned in my math or science class or english class in the job that i got paid for this summer, so it is more that we can expect the curriculum to real world experiences that students understand are going to connect them to what they're going to do in the future i think the more engaging the curriculum becomes and the more we keep the students engaged and i am committing publicly we want the students involved and we want your feedback. >> about what about the simpler things and the resources? because a lot of students -- muni passes and students can't access the schools without getting on the back of the bus and maybe a chance of getting caught by the muni police? or the simple stuff like the libraries? and access to printers? what if there is not access at homes? what about the simpler things for students? >> great idea. you probably notice we're taking notes. i think they're great ideas and again we're going to be tapping your ideas about how do we really engage the authentic student voices and not only at high school level but middle school and elementary school as wel
a history degree over a computer science degree. there has to be more rewards for the need in america or the jobs are going to start going abroad faster and faster, high paying jobs. there's no specific plan to get that done. >> all right. that's got to be the last word. all right. did you catch who these guys are talking about? >> that man is working hard for you. >> a true hero. >> you're lucky to have a guy so bright and so capable and committed. my friend, and a true patriot. >> well, obviously, they're referring to none other than our neil cavuto covering the debates like no one else starting this wednesday live from denver, kicking off on fox news at 4 p.m. eastern and neil gets the biggest and brightest players, so, watch it and profit. before the first presidential debate. neil talks to the republican vice-presidential nominee. >> you mentioned bowles simpson, sir, and you voted against that, so, your critics say-- >> i like that part of bowls simpson. the critics say you talk a good game and you don't deliver the goods. what do you say? >> will paul ryan's answer be to fix it
, too. as it is, we're falling behind in math and science throughout the world. the states are broke. i get them. i'm not sure we shoulder our kids with the burden. >> jim, last word before we go to break. >> these are not mutually exclusive. it will save monies that can be saved. it will push kids through the system that should be pushed through the system. even if you aren't going to divert that money elsewhere, it will leave more money to give those kids that need the attention more help. >> all right, guys. great discussion. very interesting discussion. thank you very much. well, coming up, everybody, get out your checkbook and maybe life preserver. a new report showing a titanic size bail-out may be sink taxpayers. talk about a food fight. students revolting against the government's new healthy school lunch program. they've been committed to putting clients first. helping generations through tough times. good times. never taking a bailout. there when you need them. helping millions of americans over the centuries. the strength of a global financial leader. the heart of a one-to-one
: almost 68% of the total registered voters will request a mail in ballot. san jose state political science profession or says campaigning know they have to reach voters sooner. >> they have to put those ads out earlier than they would have in the past. >> one of the most talked about initiatives in san jose, it would raise minimum age from 8 to $10 an hour. they say their grass roots campaign can't take any votes for granted. >> we started not just a few weeks before the early voting but we have been going at it for about 2 months now. >> reporter: backed by the silicone valley chamber of customers. these political ads are going up now. say early voting and mail in ballot make it more expensive. but waiting until the end of october is not an option. >> if you wait you have no chance of winning. >> reporter: several bat on the drop off-sites like this one will open up october 8. you can go to our website for locations. just click on web links. matt keller. >>> some same sex couples are getting a reprieve from the federal government. partners in which one is an illegal immigrant will put the
they build up the man immediately. >> excess demand for the platform is an early science and success and challenge as opposed to total failure. it is hard to know how large scale the test needs to be. large school districts, very large ones have a lot of students. doesn't take too many large school districts to be able to have a sufficiently sized test bed to do this rapidly. and to overcome that. we will find school systems willing to join. one avenue is the league of innovative schools and large school districts. this will be different but perhaps those schools signal interest and innovation and general technology to become part of the test bed to start to look and i hope this is something we can overcome but it will require some skill if we get a lot of excitement. >> could everyone join me in thanking our excellent offers an excellent panel. >> now the keynote speaker at the brookings institution forum. education secretary arne duncan talks about progress in k-12 education and his reform effort. following his remarks, questions from the audience. >> by the end of this decade to h
acknowledges and celebrates recovery from addiction and mental illness, of advances int science -- through evidence based practices and thousands upon thousands of united voices of recovery across the country. recovery has captured an audience and is rallying in nations. about this time two years ago leaders and the liberal health field, consisting of people in recovery from mental health and substance abuse, met -- in on these efforts and in consultation with many stakeholders, samhsa has come up with a working definition and set of principles for recovery. i invite you to go on for .samhsa.gov.ww defining it has been a true process. now we are working with persons and recovery for mental illness and substance abuse to articulate the differences. as well as the commonalities of these respective prophecies. we agree on the guiding principles to recovery through terms and concepts such as hope pacs, a person driven, a holistic work. many pathways, relational, culture, addressing a trauma, strength and responsibility, and respect. a bit later in the program you will hear directly from a few
striking for their kids. >> how about science deniers. the science is in. you have to get that in. birther three is critical for learning. it is a funding issue. if you don't have money for kids until they are six years old to start kinder garden, you have missed that -- those critical brain development years. we are starting to fund public education too late. >> i want to unpack one thing pedro said so people understand. when we say integration is off the table in public schools, what we are talking about is that justice roberts ruled in 2007 in the seattle school's decision that schools could not take race into a factor at all to integrate public schools. that's where brown ended and so i just think as a big point, not that we have all the time in the world for it but part of these reform issues are also about reforming the courts. there are certain decisions we talk a lot about in money and politics. this area of integration is something that is going to come from reforming. >> i have been so revved up since education nation. we are doing a little education every week. you guys are alre
x-ray, please! [ nurse ] i'm a nurse. i believe in the power of science and medicine. but i'm also human. and i believe in stacking the deck. [ female announcer ] to nurses everywhere, thank you, from johnson & johnson. nature valley trail mix bars are made with real ingredients you can see. like whole roasted nuts, chewy granola, and real fruit. nature valley trail mix bars. 100% natural. 100% delicious. side by side so you get the same coverage, often for less. that's one smart board. what else does it do, reverse gravity? [ laughs ] [ laughs ] [ whooshing ] tell me about it. why am i not going anywhere? you don't believe hard enough. a smarter way to shop around. now that's progressive. call or click today. [ grunting ] >>> in northern ireland, thousands of people are marching through bellfast the signing of a prounion document. there are fears this could inflame tensions between catholics and protestants and police are stationed along the parade route to prevent any violence. >>> closer to home now, officials in michigan say they'll soon know if soil samples taken beneath a sto
-- practicing for months. >> rick: susan estrich is a professor of law and political science, fox news contributor. i love watching both sigh tries raise the bar for the opponent. kind of like a joke, isn't it susan? >> it is a pretty good joke. look, bottle of these guys are running for -- both of these guys are running for president. i think voters have a right to have high expectations about both of them. this gameworks when you are in primaries and it is a long process and it is up and down. i don't think it works in debates, unless like the clip you just showed you have somebody like reagan, who had been constantly attacked that he was not ready, not capable. and the fact that he turned in a completely solid debate performance against a guy, carter who was not liked at all that won the floor fell out. ironly debate, the people who come in for -- usually the debates the people who come in for romney, will come out for romney the people who come out for obama will come out for obama unless there's a big mistake one way or another probably won't change much. >> rick: likely voters we
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. american people, that's one of the most confounds parts of all of this is this race between romney and the president. is that the polls reflect just as you said, what you are showing there on economic policy. >> yeah. >> the idea that it is this close is once, you know, it's surprising that romney is doing this well. it is surprising that the president is doing this well. it. >> bill: why is it surprising that romney is doing this well? >> because, if you turn on any television set, where there are people who are paying attention to this, somebody has advice about how romney can be doing better. >> bill: all right. >> they talk as if he is 10 points down. bill about bill that's a good point. the media is slapping him around. >> absolutely. >> bill: 40% of the american people, 40% think that barack obama's economic policies have helped this country. now, let's be fair though. they have helped the auto industry. >> yeah. >> bill: you would cede t
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of science and medicine. but i'm also human. and i believe in stacking the deck. [ female announcer ] to nurses everywhere, thank you, from johnson & johnson. [ female announcer ] to nurses everywhere, thank you, mr. speaker, uh, members of congress. in celebration of over 75 years of our government employees insurance company, or geico...as most of you know it. ...i propose savings for everyone! i'm talking hundreds here... and furthermore.. newcaster: breaking news. the gecko is demanding free pudding. and political parties that are actual parties! with cake! and presents! ah, that was good. too bad nobody could hear me. geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more on car insurance. >>> in afghanistan, most of the girls have no voice. they are used as property of a family. the picture is very grim. my name is razia jan, and i'm founder of a girls school in afghanistan. when we opened the school in 2008, 90% of them could not write their name. today, 100% of them are educated. they can dream, they can write. i lived in the u.s. for over 38 years, but i was really a
, that there are -- i'm not sure what the, you know, what the science behind that might be. but i think that it can cut both ways. >> how about the money aspect of this from the super pacs? because might they, particularly in swing states, if you see mitt romney behind, might the super pacs say, okay we're not going to put our money behind the presidential race, instead we'll go to the house and senate races in those states? >> i think you can see that. i think we may have seen some of that from crossroads gps who really astoundingly when i look back at the numbers that we get from the ad tracking firm that we partner with, they were completely dark in august. i was just shocking, really. but american crossroads has poured in more than $16 million now for the fall. so, they're still playing heavily. and there are these other outside groups that have come in. things like americans for job security. secure america now. who are spending significant amounts of money and kind of making up for some of those, which they're just so many super pacs, especially on the conservative side that they're still outspen
. dante scala is a professor of political science at the university of new hampshire, and "the washington post" deputy political editor, anne kornblut stuck around too. dante, you're on the ground there in the granite state. you're very familiar with that electorate. latest nbc news/marist poll, likely voters, president obama 51%, mitt romney 44%. what's the likelihood that the governor is able to close that gap between now and the first tuesday in november? >> i think it's going to take, craig, a national rebound for mitt romney to make it competitive here in new hampshire. there's no evidence that despite the fact that governor romney has campaigned in new hampshire off and on, really for most of the past decade, there's no evidence that he owns any kind of specific backyard advantage here in this new england state. his favorables to unfavorables are -- his unfavorables outweigh his favorables here in the state, which is striking given the amount of time he spent campaigning here. so new hampshire really is behaving the way it did four years ago, as a democratic-leaning bellwether state
you moving. ♪ feeling free. ♪ >>> sunday morning on "biocentury this week." science and the age of austerity. what will deep budget cults mean for n.i.h.? -- cuts mean for n.i.h.? watch "biocentury this week" ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ahh, i've been crawling around this desert all day. it's hot, my throat is dry. i need water! water! oh, thanks. let's go check out some more animals. we're here in the colorado desert with my friend liz, who's the animal curator at the living desert zoo and botanical gardens. and we've come across a really interesting and an easy animal to really approach in the desert, because they don't move very fast. and, liz, this is a california desert tortoise, right? liz: right. jarod: now, this particular desert tortoise, this is probably one of the most ultimately adapted animals of all. i mean, they've been around for millions of years. turtles and tortoises are -- i mean, there are so many adaptations, but this particular specie of desert tortoise has really adapted to kind of take it to the next level and really handle some extreme conditions. liz: yes. jar
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